RESEARCH PAPER
Age of smoking initiation and risk of breast cancer in a sample of Ontario women
Erin Young 1,   Scott T. Leatherdale 1, 2, 3  
,   Margaret Sloan 2,   Nancy Kreiger 1, 2, 4,   Andriana Barisic 2
 
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1
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
2
Department of Population Studies and Surveillance, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Canada
3
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada
4
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
Publication date: 2010-02-17
 
Tobacco Induced Diseases 2009;5(February):4
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Objectives:
To examine the association between time of smoking initiation and both the independent and joint effects of active and passive tobacco smoke exposure and the risk of breast cancer in a sample of Ontario women.

Methods:
Data from two large population-based case-control studies conducted among Ontario women aged 25–75 years were combined for analysis (n = 12,768).

Results:
Women who had ever smoked and were exposed to passive smoke had a significant increased risk of breast cancer (OR 1.13, 95%CI 1.01–1.25). A significant increased risk was also observed among women who initiated smoking: at age 26 or older (OR 1.26, 95%CI 1.03–1.55); more than five years from menarche (OR 1.26, 95%CI 1.12–1.42); and, after their first live birth (OR 1.25, 95%CI 1.02–1.52).

Conclusions:
The results suggest that women who initiate smoking at an older age are at an increased risk of breast cancer.

 
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