RESEARCH PAPER
Smoking Habits Among Patients Diagnosed with Oral Lichen Planus
 
More details
Hide details
1
The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger School of Dental Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv Israel
 
2
Department of Oral Medicine and Clinical Dentistry, Interdisciplinary Program in Oral Cancer Biology, Prevention and Treatment, College of Dentistry, College of Medicine, Chicago Cancer Center, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA
 
3
Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences MC 838, Chicago, USA
 
 
Publication date: 2004-06-15
 
 
Corresponding author
Joel B. Epstein   

Department of Oral Medicine and Clinical Dentistry, Interdisciplinary Program in Oral Cancer Biology, Prevention and Treatment, College of Dentistry, College of Medicine, Chicago Cancer Center, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA
 
 
Tobacco Induced Diseases 2004;2(June):103
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Introduction:
Oral lichen planus (OLP) is one of the most common dermatologic diseases that manifests in the oral cavity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between smoking habits and the clinical subtypes of OLP.

Methods:
Oral findings and smoking data from 187 charts of OLP patients from an oral medicine clinic was reviewed and compared to data from 76 matched control patients.

Results and Discussion:
Ninety-three patients were diagnosed with reticular OLP, 55 with atrophic and 39 with erosive forms of the disease. Symptomatic OLP occurred in 63.6% of patients. Fewer cases of reticular OLP were symptomatic than erosive OLP (p < 0.001). Significantly fewer OLP patients smoked than the control group (16% versus 25%) (p = 0.04). More patients with reticular OLP smoked than those with atrophic and erosive OLP (p = 0.002). It is hypothesized that the heat and irritation of smoking may aggravate symptomatic OLP lesions, and the risk of malignant transformation associated with tobacco use may play a role in patients stopping tobacco use. Because there were fewer smokers in patients with OLP, and because OLP carries an increased malignant risk, transformation of OLP may be due to a different etiology and of a different pathogenesis than squamous cell carcinoma not arising from lichen planus. Close follow-up of patients with OLP is indicated.

 
REFERENCES (15)
1.
Axell T: A prevalence study of oral mucosal lesions in an adult Swedish population. Odontologisk Revy. 1976, 27: 1-103.
 
2.
Kleinman DV, Swango PA, Niessen LC: Epidemiologic studies of oral mucosal conditionsmethodologic issues. Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology. 1991, 19: 129-140. 10.1111/j.1600-0528.1991.tb00128.x.
 
3.
Silverman S, Gorsky M, Lozada-Nur F, Giannotti K: A prospective study of findings and management in 214 patients with oral lichen planus. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology. 1991, 72: 665-670. 10.1016/0030-4220(91)90007-Y.
 
4.
Gorsky M, Raviv M, Moskona D, Laufer M, Bodner L: Clinical characteristics and treatment of patients with oral lichen planus in Israel. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology and Endodontics. 1996, 82: 644-649. 10.1016/S1079-2104(96)80439-2.
 
5.
Silverman S, Gorsky M, Lozada-Nur F: A prospective follow-up study of 570 patients with oral lichen planus: Persistence, remission, and malignant association. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology. 1985, 60: 30-34. 10.1016/0030-4220(85)90210-5.
 
6.
Neumann-Jensen B, Holmstrup P, Pindborg JJ: Smoking habits of 611 patients with oral lichen planus. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology. 1977, 43: 410-415. 10.1016/0030-4220(77)90328-0.
 
7.
Pindborg JJ, Mehta FS, Daftary DK, Gupta PC, Bhonsle RB: Prevalence of oral lichen planus among 7639 Indian villagers in Kerala, South India. Acta Dermato-Venereologica. 1972, 52: 216-220.
 
8.
Tamir D, Dayan I, Weinstein R, Arin R: Knowledge, strategies of medical behaviors in Israel. 1988, Israeli Ministry of Health publication, 47-53.
 
9.
Eisenberg E, Krutchkoff DJ: Lichenoid lesions of oral mucosa. Diagnostic criteria and their importance in the alleged relationship to oral cancer. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology. 1992, 73: 699-704. 10.1016/0030-4220(92)90013-G.
 
10.
Zhang L, Cheng X, Li Y, Poh C, Zeng T: High frequency of allelic loss in dysplastic lichenoid lesions. Laboratory Investigation. 2000, 80: 233-237. 10.1038/labinvest.3780026.
 
11.
Mignogna MD, Lo Muzio LL, Lo Russo LL, Fedele S, Ruoppo E, Bucci E: Clinical guidelines in early detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma arising in oral lichen planus: A 5-year experience. Oral Oncology. 2001, 37: 262-267. 10.1016/S1368-8375(00)00096-8.
 
12.
Meij van der EH, Schepman KP, Smeele LE, Waal van der JE, Bezemer PD, Waal van der I: A review of the recent literature regarding malignant transformation of oral lichen planus. Oral Surg Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology and Endodontics. 1999, 88: 307-310.
 
13.
Markopoulos AK, Antoniades D, Papanayotou P, Trigonidis G: Malignant potential of oral lichen planus; a follow-up study of 326 patients. Oral Oncology. 1997, 33: 263-269. 10.1016/S0964-1955(97)00005-5.
 
14.
Silverman S, Gorsky M, Greenspan D: Tobacco usage in patients with head and neck carcinomas: A follow-up study on habit changes and second primary oral/oropharyngeal cancers. Journal of the American Dental Association. 1983, 106: 33-35.
 
15.
Silverman S, Gorsky M: Epidemiologic and demographic update in oral cancer: California and national data-1973 to 1985. Journal of the American Dental Association. 1990, 120 (5): 495-499.
 
 
CITATIONS (18):
1.
 
2.
 
3.
 
4.
 
5.
 
6.
 
7.
 
8.
 
9.
 
10.
 
11.
 
12.
 
13.
 
14.
 
15.
 
16.
 
17.
 
18.
 
eISSN:1617-9625
Journals System - logo
Scroll to top