A cross-country comparison of secondhand smoke exposure in public places among adults in five African countries - The Global Adult Tobacco Survey, 2012 - 2015
 
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1
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, United States of America
2
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Georgia
Publish date: 2018-03-01
 
Tob. Induc. Dis. 2018;16(Suppl 1):A150
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ABSTRACT
Background:
Secondhand smoke (SHS) causes approximately 600,000 deaths annually worldwide. Timely surveillance can inform the development and enforcement of comprehensive smoke-free policies in indoor public places; yet, in many African countries, there is limited data on SHS exposure in this environment. This study examined self-reported SHS exposure in public places in five African countries.

Methods:
Data from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) were analyzed for Cameroon (2013), Kenya (2014), Nigeria (2012), Senegal (2015), and Uganda (2013). GATS is a standardized, nationally representative household survey of individuals aged ≥15 years. Point prevalence estimates for past 30-day SHS exposure were assessed for the following environments: bars/nightclubs, restaurants, government buildings, public transportation, and healthcare facilities. Analyses were restricted to persons who reported visiting each environment. Estimates were calculated separately for all adults and nonsmokers; nonsmokers were defined as those who answered “not at all” to the question, “Do you currently smoke tobacco on a daily basis, less than daily, or not at all?” Data were weighted and analyzed using SPSS V.24.

Results:
Among all adults who visited each environment, country-specific SHS exposure ranged as follows: bars/nightclubs, 86.1% (Kenya) to 62.3% (Uganda); restaurants, 31.9% (Cameroon) to 16.0% (Uganda); government buildings, 24.2% (Senegal) to 5.7 % (Uganda); public transportation, 22.9% (Cameroon) to 7.8% (Uganda); and healthcare facilities, 10.2% (Senegal) to 4.5% (Uganda). SHS exposure among nonsmokers was as follows: bars/nightclubs, 85.6% (Kenya) to 60.9% (Uganda); restaurants, 32.0% (Cameroon) to 16.1% (Uganda); government buildings, 24.2% (Senegal) to 5.8 % (Uganda); public transportation, 22.2% (Cameroon) to 7.7% (Uganda); and healthcare facilities, 9.9% (Senegal) to 4.5% (Uganda).

Conclusions:
In the assessed African countries, SHS exposure was lowest in healthcare facilities and highest in bars/nightclubs. Smoke-free policies in indoor public places, consistent with the World Health Organization's MPOWER framework, are important to protect nonsmokers from SHS exposure.

eISSN:1617-9625