CONFERENCE PROCEEDING
Smoking status and social nicotine dependence among members in the Japanese Society of Periodontology
 
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1
Department of Dental Hygiene, Aichi Gakuin University Junior College, Aichi, Japan
2
Osaka Dental University, Osaka, Japan
3
Fukuoka Dental College, Fukuoka, Japan
4
Department of Oral Health Promotion, Matsumoto Dental University Graduate School, Nagano, Japan
5
Division of Periodontology, Department of Oral Interdisciplinary Medicine, School of Dentistry, Kanagawa Dental University, Kanagawa, Japan
6
Department of Periodontology, The Nippon Dental University School of Life Dentistry at Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
7
Department of Disaster Medicine and Dental Sociology, Graduate School of Dentistry, Kanagawa Dental University, Kanagawa, Japan
8
Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama, Japan
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Koji Inagaki   

Department of Dental Hygiene, Aichi Gakuin University Junior College, Aichi, Japan
Publication date: 2019-10-12
 
Tob. Induc. Dis. 2019;17(Suppl 1):A84
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Objective:
The aim of this study was to determine the smoking status and social nicotine dependence of the members of the Japanese Society of Periodontology (JSP).

Methods:
Self-administered smoking status questionnaires including the “The Kano Test for Social Nicotine Dependence (KTSND)” questionnaire were distributed to the members who were selected through stratified proportional random sampling.

Results:
A total of 631 members responded with a response rate of 42%. Of those who responded, 62% were males and 30% were in their 30s which was the largest percentage of all age groups. The respondents consisted of dentists (75%), dental hygienists (23%) and others (2%). With regard to workplace policy on smoking, a completely smoke-free workplace policy was reported by 48% of respondents, and 35% reported that smoking was allowed only outside of buildings. The possible rate of second-hand smoke at home was 31%. The sample included 376 people who had never smoked (60%), 211 ex-smokers (33%), and 44 active smokers (7%). The prevalence of smoking in dentists was 8%, which was higher than that in dental hygienists (2%, P < 0.05). By qualification, the prevalence of smoking in all certified periodontists was 8%, which was lower than that in general members (9%). The total KTSND score was 12.2 ± 5.2 in this sample. According to smoking status, the KTSND scores were 11.3 ± 5.1 in non-smokers, 12.9 ± 4.9 in ex-smokers, and 16.9 ± 4.8 in smokers. Smokers’ and ex-smokers’ KTSND scores were significantly higher than those in non-smokers (P < 0.01).

Conclusions:
The present study highlights the importance of focusing attention on smoking cessation training in periodontal treatments addressed to JSP members.

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