SHORT REPORT
Smoking Habit in Severe Obese after bariatric procedures
 
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1
Section of Respiratory Medicine, Hospital S. Maria della Pietà, Naples, Italy
2
Institute of Respiratory Disease, University of Medicine, Bari, Italy
3
Department of Surgery, Hospital S. Maria della Pietà, Naples, Italy
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Pierluigi Carratù   

Institute of Respiratory Disease, University of Medicine, Piazza G. Cesare 12, 70124 Bari, Italy
Publish date: 2015-07-29
 
Tobacco Induced Diseases 2015;13(July):20
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Background:
Bariatric procedures provide an effective means of short term weight loss and sustained weight control for the morbidly obese. The effect of bariatric procedures on smoking habit in obese subjects is not well known. Therefore, we examined the short term effect of bariatric surgery on smoking habit of severe obese patients up to 12 months from the intervention.

Methods:
Smoking habit was assessed in a cohort of 78 morbid smoking obese patients followed at our clinic for bariatric procedures. They underwent non surgical intra-gastric balloon (IB) or surgical procedures such as lap–band laparoscopic surgery (LAGB) or sleeve gastrectomy/gastric by-pass (SPG). Subjects were administered a written questionnaire about their smoking habit before and 3, 6 and 12 months after the procedures.

Results:
No differences were found among the three groups at 6 and 12 months after the procedures (IB 21 %, LAGB 6 %, SPG 5 %; and IB 14 %, LAGB 3 %, SPG 5 %). Only after 3 months, the rate of quitting of the IB group was higher than LAGB and SPG groups (36 %, 6 % and 5 %, respectively; p = 0.02).

Conclusions:
Bariatric procedures have no effects on smoking habit of moderate-to-heavy smoker severe obese patients. The use of other traditional smoking cessation methods in patients undergone to bariatric procedures should be implemented.

 
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