SHORT REPORT
Reported municipal costs from outdoor smoke-free by-laws-experience from Ontario, Canada
 
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1
Propel Centre for Population Health Impact, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada
2
Department of Health, Behavior & Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Institute for Global Tobacco Control, Baltimore, USA
3
School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Ryan David Kennedy   

Propel Centre for Population Health Impact, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
Publish date: 2014-02-28
 
Tobacco Induced Diseases 2014;12(February):4
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Background:
In 2006, enclosed public and workplaces in Ontario were made smoke-free by the Smoke-free Ontario Act (SFOA). Numerous area municipalities across the province have since developed local by-laws that are more restrictive than the SFOA and ban smoking in outdoor environments including parks, beaches, and patios. The current study measured reported costs associated with the implementation and enforcement of smoke-free outdoor municipal by-laws including materials and staffing costs. The study also assessed the number of warnings or tickets issued to smokers. Ontario communities with a by-law in force for at least 2 years were included in the sample (n = 42). The study was completed by 88% of area municipalities (n = 37). Municipal staff and managers completed a survey by telephone between June-September 2012.

Methods:
No area municipality surveyed reported that they hired additional enforcement staff as a result of their community’s smoke-free by-law. Most municipalities (95%) posted signage to support awareness of their by-law; signs costs ranged from $40-$150/sign with most municipalities reporting signs were made in-house. Most communities reported actively enforcing the by-law; six communities reported they had issued tickets to people not in compliance with outdoor smoking restrictions.

Conclusions:
The implementation, promotion, and enforcement of outdoor smoke-free by-laws have required municipal staff time and in most cases have promotional costs, but these have come from existing budgets and using existing staff. Outdoor smoke-free by-laws have not created significant burdens on municipal enforcement staff or on municipal budgets.

 
REFERENCES (8)
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Reid JL, Hammond D, Burkhalter R, Rynard VL, Ahmed R: Tobacco Use in Canada: Patterns and Trends. 2013, Waterloo, ON: Propel Centre for Population Health Impact, University of Waterloo, 2013.
 
2.
Ontario Ministry of Health and Long Term Care. [http://www.mhp.gov.on.ca/en/sm...].
 
3.
Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing: Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing. [http://www.mah.gov.on.ca/Page1...].
 
4.
Simcoe and Muskoka Health Unit (Ontario): Local Bylaws Designate Smoke-Free Outdoor Spaces. [http://www.simcoemuskokahealth...].
 
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Physicians for a Smoke-Free Canada. [http://www.smoke-free.ca/pdf_1...].
 
7.
Program Training and Consultation Centre (PTCC). [http://www.ptcc-cfc.on.ca/cms/...].
 
8.
Non-Smokers’ Rights Association (NSRA): NSRA's Smoke-Free Laws Database. [http://www.nsra-adnf.ca/cms/sm...].
 
 
CITATIONS (2):
1.
Explaining Mechanisms That Influence Smoke-Free Implementation at the Local Level: A Realist Review of Smoking Bans
Martin Mlinarić, Laura Hoffmann, Anton E Kunst, Michael Schreuders, Marc C Willemsen, Irene Moor, Matthias Richter
Nicotine & Tobacco Research
 
2.
Implementation phase of the Tobacco-Free Parks Ordinance: a policy evaluation using photographic data
L. Michele Issel, K. Bayha, A. Nelson
Public Health
 
eISSN:1617-9625