Randomized controlled trial of the Tobacco Tactics website versus 1-800-QUIT-NOW telephone line among Operating Engineers
David L Ronis 1
,  
Devon Noonan 2
,  
Oisaeng Hong 3
,  
John D Meeker 6
,  
Sonia A. Duffy 1, 4, 7  
 
 
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1
School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA
2
School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, USA
3
Department of Community Health Systems, University of California, San Francisco, USA
4
Ann Arbor VA Center for Clinical Management Research, Health Services Research and Development, Ann Arbor, USA
5
Department of Family Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA
6
School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA
7
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA
Publish date: 2014-06-06
 
Tobacco Induced Diseases 2014;12(Suppl 1):AA13
KEYWORDS:
ABSTRACT:
Background:
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and usage of the Tobacco Tactics website compared to the 1-800-QUIT-NOW telephone line among Operating Engineers (heavy equipment operators).

Methods:
Smokers attending workplace safety training groups were randomized to either the Tobacco Tactics website with nurse phone counseling and access to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) or to the 1-800-QUIT-NOW telephone line which provided an equal number of phone calls and NRT. Participating Operating Engineers completed a baseline survey as well as mailed surveys at 30-days and 6-months. Urinary cotinine tests were used to verify 6-month smoking status. The outcomes were compared using χ2 tests, t-tests, mixed models, generalized mixed models, and logistic regression models.

Results:
Compared to participants in the 1-800-QUIT-NOW group, significantly more of those in the Tobacco Tactics website group participated in the intervention, received phone calls and found the intervention helpful (p<0.05). Seventy percent of the website group received NRT compared to 5.1% of the quitline group (p<0.001). At 30-day follow-up, the Tobacco Tactics website group showed significantly higher quit rates (26.9%) than the 1-800-QUIT-NOW group (7.7%) (p<0.05), but this difference was no longer significant at 6-month follow-up. There were significantly more positive changes in harm reduction measures (quit attempts, number of cigarettes smoked per day, and nicotine dependence) at both 30-day and 6-month follow-up in the Tobacco Tactics website group compared to the 1-800-QUIT-NOW group (p<0.05).

Conclusions:
The Tobacco Tactics website showed higher efficacy and reach than the 1-800-QUIT-NOW intervention. Longer counseling sessions may be needed to improve 6-month cessation rates. This intervention has the potential to reduce morbidity and mortality among Operating Engineers.

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR:
Sonia A. Duffy   
School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48105, USA
eISSN:1617-9625