SHORT REPORT
Overview of state policies requiring smoking cessation therapy in psychiatric hospitals and drug abuse treatment centers
 
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1
Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of California, San Francisco, USA
2
Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California, San Francisco, USA
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Dorie E. Apollonio   

Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California, 3333 California Street, Suite 420, San Francisco, CA 94143 – 0613, USA
Publish date: 2015-10-22
 
Tobacco Induced Diseases 2015;13(October):33
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Background:
Research demonstrates that individuals in substance abuse treatment are more likely to die from tobacco addiction than from their primary addiction, yet historically substance abuse treatment has not included treatment for tobacco addiction. The purpose of our study was to (1) review the diffusion of state policies mandating the provision of tobacco cessation treatment as a condition of state licensure in substance abuse treatment facilities and psychiatric treatment centers and (2) describe the current landscape of policies relating to tobacco cessation in state-licensed substance abuse treatment facilities and psychiatric treatment centers.

Methods:
We conducted a nationwide assessment of all 50 states from May 2013 - October 2014 to determine the progress each has made with developing a statewide tobacco cessation policy. We reviewed state government websites, conducted phone interviews with state regulatory agencies, and emailed state employees. Overall, 13 of 50 states (26 %) require tobacco cessation provision in alcohol, drug rehabilitation, and or mental health treatment centers, 6 states (12 %) are currently working towards a state policy, and 31 states (62 %) do not require tobacco cessation nor are working towards a state policy, though many of them have smoke free policies in both substance abuse centers and mental health wards.

Conclusions:
Our updated review of statewide smoking cessation policies in alcoholic, drug abuse, and mental health populations reveals that while clinical findings that affect population health may be well-publicized in the research community, these findings are not necessarily translated into policy. Further research on policy diffusion is needed.

 
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CITATIONS (11):
1.
Realizing the Potential of Cancer Prevention — The Role of Implementation Science
Karen M. Emmons, Graham A. Colditz
New England Journal of Medicine
 
2.
A cross-sectional analysis of factors associated with the intention to engage in tobacco treatment among inpatients in a state psychiatric hospital
C. T. C. Okoli, J. K. Otachi, A. Manuel, M. Woods
Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing
 
3.
Drug abuse staff and clients smoking together: A shared addiction
Joseph Guydish, Thao Le, Barbara Campbell, Deborah Yip, Suzhe Ji, Kevin Delucchi
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment
 
4.
Availability of tobacco cessation services in substance use disorder treatment programs: Impact of state tobacco control policy
Amanda J. Abraham, Grace Bagwell-Adams, Jayani Jayawardhana
Addictive Behaviors
 
5.
Barriers and Facilitators to Tobacco Cessation in a Nationwide Sample of Addiction Treatment Programs
Anna Pagano, Barbara Tajima, Joseph Guydish
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment
 
6.
Smoking-related outcomes and associations with tobacco-free policy in addiction treatment, 2015–2016
Joseph Guydish, Deborah Yip, Thao Le, Noah R. Gubner, Kevin Delucchi, Paul Roman
Drug and Alcohol Dependence
 
7.
Quitting smoking during substance use disorders treatment: Patient and treatment-related variables
Barbara K. Campbell, Thao Le, Barbara Tajima, Joseph Guydish
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment
 
8.
Brief Report: The effect of implementing a tobacco treatment service on adherence to evidence-based practice in an inpatient state-owned psychiatric hospital
Chizimuzo T. C. Okoli, Yazan D. Al-Mrayat, Barbara Stead
The American Journal on Addictions
 
9.
Perceived barriers to quitting cigarettes among hospitalized smokers with substance use disorders: A mixed methods study
Hasmeena Kathuria, Ryan Seibert, Vinson Cobb, Nicole Herbst, Zoe Weinstein, Minda Gowarty, Reha Jhunjhunwala, Eric Helm, Renda Wiener
Addictive Behaviors
 
10.
Assessing opinions and barriers to providing evidence-based tobacco treatment among health care providers within an in-patient psychiatric facility
Chizimuzo Okoli, Janet Otachi, Sarret Seng
Journal of Mental Health
 
11.
Assessing the Availability of Pharmacotherapy Options for Tobacco Cessation in Tennessee’s Substance Use Facilities
John Boatner, David Patterson, Freida Herron, William Nugent, Timothy Rice
Southern Medical Journal
 
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