National estimates and correlates of cigarette smoking among Hispanic/Latino construction workers in the US
 
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1
University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, United States of America
2
University of Memphis, United States of America
Publication date: 2018-03-01
 
Tob. Induc. Dis. 2018;16(Suppl 1):A924
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ABSTRACT
Background:
Smoking prevalence among construction workers (CWs) is nearly twice the national average of smoking in the US. In 2014, there were more than 2.6 million Hispanic/Latino CWs in the US, representing nearly a third of the US construction workforce. In this study, we used a national sample of US adults to examine the prevalence and predictors of cigarette smoking among Hispanic/Latino CWs.

Methods:
Data were pooled from the 2001-2010 (5 cycles) National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. All respondents > 20 years who self-identified as Hispanics/Latino and were working in the construction industry were selected (n= 430). We calculated prevalence rates and 95% confidence intervals of the demographic characteristics of workers stratified by smoking status (current, former, never smoker). Logistic regression analysis were performed with adjustments made for the complex survey design.

Results:
Overall, 99.0% of Hispanic/Latino CWs were males, 17.9% were non-US born, 42.4% spoke only Spanish, 61.3% did not complete high school, 32.0% were without health insurance, 30.5% fell below the poverty level, and 31.0% reported smoking. The mean age at initiation of smoking was 15.1 (SD= 13.7-16.4), and the mean of number of cigarettes smoked per day was 12.1 (4.5-19.7). Compared to workers who do not smoke, smokers were significantly more likely to be between the ages of 20-45 (78.8% vs. 90.2%), have higher exposure to mineral dusts at work ( 38.4 vs. 66.0%) and secondhand smoke at home (4.9% vs. 23.3%) and work (29.5% vs. 43.3%), and higher level of depression (2.9% vs. 8.8%) (P< 0.05 for all).

Conclusions:
Smoking prevalence is high among Hispanic/Latino CWs. This group was identified as a high-risk group for smoking-related health problems and injuries, and should therefore be a prime focus for smoking cessation efforts. Future smoking cessation interventions need to be adapted to their culture and work/life circumstances.

eISSN:1617-9625