RESEARCH PAPER
Factors associated with smoking cessation and relapse in the Japanese smoking cessation treatment program: A prospective cohort study based on financial support in Suita City, Japan
Meng Li 1
,  
Reiko Okamoto 1  
,  
 
 
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1
Public Health Nursing Laboratory, Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Japan
2
Community Health-Care System Science Laboratory, Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Japan
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Reiko Okamoto   

Public Health Nursing Laboratory, Division of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 1-7 Yamadaoka, Suita City, Osaka Prefecture, 565-0871, Japan
Publish date: 2019-10-02
 
Tob. Induc. Dis. 2019;17(October):71
KEYWORDS
TOPICS
ABSTRACT
Introduction:
The purpose of this study is to clarify the effect of providing financial support and factors associated with smoking cessation and relapse in the Japanese smoking cessation treatment (SCT) program based on financial support.

Methods:
A prospective cohort study was conducted at the smoking cessation outpatients of hospitals or clinics in Suita City, Japan from May 2017 to September 2018. In all, 153 participants were recruited and received standardized treatment based on the SCT program. Participants were required to answer four questionnaires and register for the financial support program. Chi-squared test, Fisher’s exact test, non-paired t-test and log-binomial regression analysis were used to analyze the data.

Results:
Of the 153 participants, 140 participants completed a 12-week treatment and the completion rate was 91.5%. There were no factors significantly associated with smoking cessation and relapse (p<0.05). However, male, cigarettes smoked per day, having present diseases, having previous abstinence, living with family, cohabitation with smokers, desire to smoke at the start of treatment, self-efficacy at the start of treatment, desire to smoke at 4 weeks and self-efficacy at 4 weeks showed statistically significant odds ratio for success of smoking cessation. Similarly at 12 weeks, male, age at smoking initiation, cigarettes smoked per day, having previous abstinence, living with family, cohabitation with smokers, desire to smoke, self-efficacy and depression disorders showed statistically significant odds ratio for smoking relapse. In addition, the rate of abstainers using varenicline was 68.60%, which was higher than abstainers using nicotine patch (55.60%) and the relapse rate of participants using nicotine patch was 100.00%, significantly higher than for relapsers using varenicline (45.80%).

Conclusions:
Further study is expected to clarify the effect of providing financial support and the factors associated with smoking cessation and relapse in the SCT program based on financial support.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The authors gratefully acknowledge the staff at the Health Center of Suita City for their guidance and partnership. The authors also thank other members of the Public Health Nursing Laboratory for helpful comments and advice on this manuscript.
CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
The authors have completed and submitted the ICMJE Form for Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest and none was reported.
FUNDING
There was no source of funding for this research.
PROVENANCE AND PEER REVIEW
Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.
 
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