REVIEW PAPER
Experimental animal models for COPD: a methodological review
 
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1
Pharmaceutical Research Centre and Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
2
Neurogenic Inflammation Research Centre and Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Mohammad Hossein Boskabady   

Neurogenic Inflammation Research Centre and Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad 9177948564, Iran
Publish date: 2017-05-02
 
Tob. Induc. Dis. 2017;15(May):25
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Introduction:
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive disorder that makes the breathing difficult and is characterized by pathological conditions ranging from chronic inflammation to tissue proteolysis. With regard to ethical issues related to the studies on patients with COPD, the use of animal models of COPD is inevitable. Animal models improve our knowledge about the basic mechanisms underlying COPD physiology, pathophysiology and treatment. Although these models are only able to mimic some of the features of the disease, they are valuable for further investigation of mechanisms involved in human COPD.

Methods:
We searched the literature available in Google Scholar, PubMed and ScienceDirect databases for English articles published until November 2015. For this purpose, we used 5 keywords for COPD, 3 for animal models, 4 for exposure methods, 3 for pathophysiological changes and 3 for biomarkers. One hundred and fifty-one studies were considered eligible for inclusion in this review.

Results:
According to the reviewed articles, animal models of COPD are mainly induced in mice, guinea pigs and rats. In most of the studies, this model was induced by exposure to cigarette smoke (CS), intra-tracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and intranasal elastase. There were variations in time course and dose of inducers used in different studies. The main measured parameters were lung pathological data and lung inflammation (both inflammatory cells and inflammatory mediators) in most of the studies and tracheal responsiveness (TR) in only few studies.

Conclusions:
The present review provides various methods used for induction of animal models of COPD, different animals used (mainly mice, guinea pigs and rats) and measured parameters. The information provided in this review is valuable for choosing appropriate animal, method of induction and selecting parameters to be measured in studies concerning COPD.

 
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