RESEARCH PAPER
Economic evaluation of an exercise-counselling intervention to enhance smoking cessation outcomes: The Fit2Quit trial
 
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1
University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand
2
University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
3
Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia
4
UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts & The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK
5
School of Kinesiology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
6
Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
William Leung   

University of Otago, Wellington PO Box 7343, New Zealand
Publish date: 2017-03-29
 
Tob. Induc. Dis. 2017;15(March):21
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Background:
In the Fit2Quit randomised controlled trial, insufficiently-active adult cigarette smokers who contacted Quitline for support to quit smoking were randomised to usual Quitline support or to also receive ≤10 face-to-face and telephone exercise-support sessions delivered by trained exercise facilitators over the 24-week trial. This paper aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of an exercise-counselling intervention added to Quitline compared to Quitline alone in the Fit2Quit trial.

Methods:
Within-trial and lifetime cost-effectiveness were assessed. A published Markov model was adapted, with smokers facing increased risks of lung cancer and cardiovascular disease.

Results:
Over 24 weeks, the incremental programme cost per participant in the intervention was NZ$428 (US$289 or €226; purchasing power parity-adjusted [PPP]). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for seven-day point prevalence measured at 24-week follow-up was NZ$31,733 (US$21,432 or €16,737 PPP-adjusted) per smoker abstaining. However, for the 52% who adhered to the intervention (≥7 contacts), the ICER for point prevalence was NZ$3,991 (US$2,695 or €2,105 PPP-adjusted). In this adherent subgroup, the Markov model estimated 0.057 and 0.068 discounted quality-adjusted life-year gains over the lifetime of 40-year-old males (ICER: NZ$4,431; US$2,993 or €2,337 PPP-adjusted) and females (ICER: NZ$2,909; US$1,965 or €1,534 PPP-adjusted).

Conclusions:
The exercise-counselling intervention will only be cost-effective if adherence is a minimum of ≥7 intervention calls, which in turn leads to a sufficient number of quitters for health gains.

 
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