Comparing smoking habits and tobacco-related education between Canadian and Greek medical students
 
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1
Faculty of Medicine, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece
2
Faculty of Medicine, University of Thessaly, Larisa, Greece
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Georgios-Marios Pantsidis   

Faculty of Medicine, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, 68100, Greece
Publish date: 2014-06-06
 
Tobacco Induced Diseases 2014;12(Suppl 1):AA5
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Background:
According to a survey on Canadian medical students’ smoking habits and beliefs, the key results show that the prevalence of smoking among the future healthcare professionals is high and they lack of tobacco-related education [1]. Last year a similar survey was conducted at Democritus University of Thrace [2]. Its findings show that there is difference in smoking habits between the two students’ groups, but their tobacco-related education is equally poor.

Methods:
In both researches participated undergraduate students who completed a questionnaire about their smoking habits, attitudes and education level towards tobacco cessation interventions.

Results:
The prevalence of cigarette smoking among Greek medical students is higher than the Canadians (24% vs. 3.3%). Although Canadian students smoke, also, other tobacco products (cigars, water pipe), the total prevalence is 15.3%. 65.5% of the Greek medical students report that they had ever tried cigarettes, but only 29.9% of the Canadian students make a same statement. Both students groups reported that they have moderate levels of education concerning tobacco-related subjects and cessation techniques. Only 8.1% of Greek and 10% of Canadian medical students report that they had ever received trainings in smoking cessation methods. Finally only a small percentage seems to be familiar with the cessation guidelines and only a few students are aware of the fact that they lack knowledge to help their patients cease smoking.

Conclusions:
The prevalence of cigarettes smoking among Greek medical students is significantly higher. Also the tobacco-related education in both countries is equally poor. It is desperately necessary to enhance the medical schools’ curricula with courses regarding smoking issues, since future physicians have a key-role in tobacco cessation and prevention.

 
REFERENCES (2)
1.
Vanderhoek AJ, Hammal F, Chappell A, Wild TC, Raupach T, Finegan BA: Future physicians and tobacco: An online survey of the habits, beliefs and knowledge base of medical students at a Canadian university. Tobacco Induced Diseases. 2013, 11 (1): 9-10.1186/1617-9625-11-9.
 
2.
Pantsidis GM, Papageorgiou DI, Bouros D: Smoking habits, attitudes and training among medical students of the Democritus University οf Thrace. Pneumon. 2012, 25: 208-218.
 
eISSN:1617-9625