Article 14 of WHO FCTC: gaps in implementation & recommendations
 
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National Institute of Cancer Prevention and Research, India
Publish date: 2018-03-01
 
Tob. Induc. Dis. 2018;16(Suppl 1):A433
KEYWORDS:
WCTOH
 
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ABSTRACT:
Background:
Article 14 of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) deals with demand reduction measures concerning tobacco dependence and cessation. This paper identifies the gaps in its implementation globally, with appropriate recommendations to fulfill the same.

Methods:
Information regarding tobacco cessation support among the WHO-FCTC member parties was obtained from the MPower 2017 database and from surveys like Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS), the Global Health Professions Student Survey and Global School Personnel Survey. In addition, meta-analysis of the results of the globally available randomized trials and cohort studies on smokeless tobacco (SLT) cessation interventions was performed, to determine the efficacy of the same.

Results:
Tobacco cessation support is available at various health care facilities in < 20% Parties; National Quitlines in 31% Parties while Nicotine Replacement Therapy in 70% parties (mostly in high resource and European countries). Very few parties provide full cost coverage of the same. Health care professionals do not equally care for SLT users and smokers. There is a lack of formal training on tobacco cessation among health professionals, health professional students and school personnel. Many countries have experience in smoking cessation but only 3% Parties have experience in SLT cessation. Meta-analysis has shown that behavioral intervention alone has 60% more chance of enabling quitting and is the most effective way of intervention both for low and high resource set ups.

Conclusions:
Tobacco cessation support and surveillance need to be strengthened especially in the low resource and high SLT burden countries. Sensitization and training on cessation to professional group is the critical issue. Effective SLT prevention &amp; cessation programs must be encouraged at school level itself.

eISSN:1617-9625